About Us


Our History:
The account of our church begins in 1774 – two years before the US Constitution! Included are excerpts of information gathered from souvenir booklets of the various anniversaries of the congregation, church record books and oral tradition. A more detailed accounting of the history of the Stone Church complete with pictures can be found by visiting the links below.


Early Settlers:
Twenty-five years before the American Revolution, early settlers of German, Scotch-Irish or English descent determined Mt. Bethel a place where they could live and worship in freedom. The early residents of this area were predominantly very poor Germans. This area afforded them the opportunity to purchase land and build homes for a small sum of money.

Lutheran and German Reformed Religion:
The earliest records of Lutheranism in this section of Northampton County take one back more than two centuries. In the year 1750 Muhlenberg visited various colonies of Lutherans in Northampton. His records tell us of one of his pastoral visits made in the year 1750, and he records the fact that on the 18th of August of the same year he forded the Delaware River near the present town of Stroudsburg. Similarly the first recorded Reformed services were held in Easton in 1760. “Early Lutheran and Reformed settlers, under the guidance of pastors from Easton, met separately in private homes. The families of Lutheran persuasion worshipped under the guidance of Rev. Christian Streit, pastor of St. John’s Lutheran Church, Easton, established circa 1740. St John’s is said to be the mother of Christ Lutheran Church. There are two churches with that name listed in Easton today. Are either of these the original “Old St. John’s?”

Click on the following links to learn more about

The First Church, the log cabin (1774-1794)
Second Church, the stone church (1794-1832)
Third Church, the church on the hill (1832-1910)
Fourth (current) Church, the union discontinued (1910-present)



The First Church, the log cabin (1774-1794)

It soon became apparent in 1774 that a larger building was necessary since the group had outgrown their homes. The land on which the First Church stood was obtained by the Lutherans from Mr. Datesman, and contained two acres, three rods and six perches. The building stood in the town of Williamsburg (now known as Mt. Bethel) on the west side of modern day Route 611 and about 90 yards south of the intersection of Route 512. The building was encircled by a large grove.
The Church was a log building 24 x 38 feet with a dirt floor and an eight-foot high ceiling. “Rough wooden slabs served as seats. Light was admitted by three small windows and through the narrow doorway the snow of winter often drifted in. At night two tallow candles, suspended by wires from the low ceiling, furnished a dim light.”
Across the street on the east side of Route 611 stands the small old Cemetery. This burial place can still be visited today, and is still being preserved by the Lutheran congregation at Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church. It is the only landmark that remains from the first church.
The actual date of the union of the Lutheran and Reformed is uncertain. But from the earliest records, begun in 1774 and which are still in a very good state of preservation, it appears that the first church was built by the Lutherans and was not originally a Union but a Lutheran Church. But it seems evident that the Reformed congregation very early in their history joined the Lutherans, probably in the same year the log building was built. The first recorded baptism was that of John Lawar (Labar) on November 12, 1774.



Second Church, the stone church (1794-1832)

After twenty years, the old log Church being inadequate for the needs of the people, the Lutheran Congregation together with the German Reformed decided to build a stone church approximately two miles south of the first edifice in the town of Centerville in 1794. (Look for Centerville Rd. across from the current church building.) The articles of agreement entered into by the Lutherans and Reformed were signed on the 29th day of May, 1794; and a stone Church was erected on the land donated by Mr. Jacob Emerich “for church, burial and school purposes.”
“The church was constructed of stone, furnished with galleries, but [had] no Narthex.” This building was located in what we now call the Old Union Cemetery (located on the west side of Route 611 between our parsonage and the church on the hill), but its exact location is not known. A school was erected down the hill and north of the stone structure at the extreme lower part of the same plot of ground. “And yet further down the hill and north of the first school a second school was built to meet the growing need of the community.” The two congregations arranged to sell this last school on August 25, 1860 and the Lutherans become the owners.



Third Church, the church on the hill (1832-1910)

In the year 1830, after thirty-six years in the old stone structure, a third and larger structure was considered due to the growth of the two congregations. The Evangelical Lutherans and German Reformed Congregations purchased an acre and a half of adjoining land from Mr. Abraham Depui (Depue) for the sum of 150 dollars and it is said an additional acre and a half were purchased a little later for the same price. On October 26, 1830 articles of agreement were entered into to build the third Church. There is so much more to tell about this church building that was shared for 136 years…the bricks have their own rich history, there is an oral tradition regarding the two doors, the interior was different from the church of today the current home of Trinity UCC.





Fourth (current) Church, the union discontinued (1910-present)

The Rev. W. E. Wenner became pastor of Christ Lutheran Church on July 3rd, 1908. It was during the pastorate of the Rev. Wenner that the joint interests of the Lutheran and Reformed in the Union Church were dissolved after 136 years. After the separation had been accomplished the Lutheran Congregation purchased a lot for two thousand dollars just north and across the road from the former building on the east side of Route 611.
The splendid building in which we are now worshipping was erected in 1911-1912 at a cost of approximately twenty-five thousand dollars. The building was consecrated with a week of Services, beginning the last Sunday in October, and concluding the first Sunday in November of 1912.
Amid rapid growth the church embarked upon an expansion program in 1962 to build an educational wing.